Flower Superstitions That Will Change the Way You See Flowers

12/01/2021

Flower Superstitions That Will Change the Way You See Flowers 

There are many interesting beliefs associated with flowers. Would you believe us if we told you some cultures consider even-numbered bouquets as bad luck? This is true for Russia, Ukraine, and other member countries of the Soviet Union. Arrangements with an even number of flowers are reserved for mourning and funerals. 

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You’ll hear of many other flower-related traditions, beliefs, practices, and superstitions around the world. Some make sense, some not so much, and some are extra fascinating than the others. Let’s learn about an assortment of them and gain a better understanding of not just flowers but also of history and other cultures. 

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  • In Russia, white carnations take away talent and good luck. If you intend to surprise a loved one with flowers after a performance on stage, consider giving a bouquet without white carnations. And for flower receivers, make sure you don’t throw away the bouquet just yet once they wilt. Keep them for a few days for flowers that fade in the house are said to bring good news.  
  • Also avoid white calla lilies for weddings as this flower, in Russian tradition, symbolize death which could mean the death of the newly-concluded marriage.   Yellow roses are a no-no, too, for a romantic gift as it stands for unfaithfulness. Giving a bouquet of yellow roses to your romantic partner would lead to fights and eventual break-up. 
  • Tossing rose leaves into fire will bring good look.  
  • Never let a rose touch the floor or it will bring bad luck. 

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  • Plant roses near graves to protect the deceased’s soul from evil. 
  • In certain parts of the British Isles, if you’re the first in your neighborhood who finds the first daffodil of spring, you will enjoy a prosperous year.  
  • String a garland of marigolds and display it on your doorstep to prevent evil and negativity from entering your home. 

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  • Victorian superstition says not to display red and white flowers together as this will mean there will be a death soon. Red and white flower arrangements are not recommended, too, as get-well gifts as they are deemed unlucky because of the death/negativity that they represent.  
  • For hospital patients receiving get-well flowers, they should leave the hospital without the same floral ensemble they were given while sick. This could mean they might return to the hospital.  
  • In India, jasmines can be found in most households as it is seen as a flower that brings good luck and prosperity. 
  • In Scotland, never bring lilac or hawthorn into a house as it will bring bad luck or possibly death upon those who live there. Hawthorn is said to be a sacred tree of witchcraft and it has long been associated with fairies and the occult. 

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  • Never give a single daffodil as it will draw ill-fortune. Make sure you give an entire bunch.  
  • Sunflowers are ideal for celebratory events like graduations and business openings. In Chinese culture, they’re thought to bring good luck and lasting happiness.  
  • It’s unlucky to walk through a mass of bluebells, pick them or bring them into the house. Bluebells were said to be full of spells.

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  • In Irish folklore, primroses are placed on the doorstep to encourage the fairy folk to bless and protect the house and those who live in it. Primroses are also loved by fairies so if you grow them, make sure you don’t let them die or you will greatly offend them. 

Indeed, there’s more to flowers than their beautiful appearance. They’re wonderful and magical creations of nature and their influence on people and the environment is simply amazing. Getting clued into how others see different types of flowers can help us make the most of this wonderful gift from nature. Equip yourself with deeper knowledge of flower symbolism to make your floral gift more exceptional and meaningful. 

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